An Indian Architect who inspires me to the core with his commitment to sustainibility practices is Mr Bijoy Jain.Mr Bijoy Jain creates a zen kind of atmosphere in any projects he does.The peace transpiring from each of these projects are ultimate.All his projects are simple and elegant and his designs let in the most amazing kind of sunlight:)-He and his "Studio Mumbai" has worked at different levels across the country proving his manifestation to the commitment.
Palmyra House, for example, was constructed with traditional building methods and all materials are locally sourced, from the foundation’s stone and sand to the joinery made from an Indian hardwood called ain wood and the ever-present palmyra louvers filtering the light and allowing rich air circulation.
As told to Guardian"The palmyra palm is considered one of the most important trees on the subcontinent, with as many as 800 documented uses. Not only does it tolerate a variety of climatic conditions, but it provides fruit, medicine, weaving and writing materials, as well as a sturdy trunk for construction that may reach as long as 30 meters.
As well, the house was built on a coconut plantation in a way that avoided the loss of income- and shade-generating trees. (While Western architects must struggle to bring light into a building, Jain’s challenge is frequently just the opposite, to cut the light.) It reflects Jain’s ethic of creating structures that deeply inhabit their environs – rather than seizing space from a landscape – a reflection of his belief that humans don’t enter a space from outside of nature but exist within the matrix.
“When I’m referring to nature, I’m referring to man and nature as being reversible or part of the same entity,” he said. “It’s very personal.”
There are other lessons to be found in the collaborative approach of Studio Mumbai.
Embracing change, for starters.
Architecture, according to Jain, must first of all “contain life”, and accomplish that in a way that recognizes that landscapes change, people change. Life itself stretches from before birth and reaches forward beyond death into decay.
Studio Mumbai  carefully develops projects through a process that draws from traditional skills, local building techniques, materials and an ingenuity that arises from limited resources. The essence of their work lies in the relationship between land and architecture. Studio Mumbai describes themselves as being “inspired by real life conditions” as they understand complex relationships through the power of observation.
“The endeavor is to show the genuine possibility in creating buildings that emerge through a process of collective dialog, a face-to-face sharing of knowledge through imagination, intimacy, and modesty.”
Projects from Studio Mumbai are Utsav House,House on Pali Hill,Copper House II , Belavali House, Leti 360,Tara House and Palmyra House,Trinity House

How  beautiful are these spaces..would love to build something closer to these homes..down south:)-fingers crossed!





























All pictures courtesy Studio Mumbai. Picture credit Helene Binet (Palmyra, Tara House), Fram Petit (Bungalow 8), Ryo Yung (Leti), Michael Freeman (Reading Room), Studio Mumbai (Leti, Pali Hill, Tara Baoli, Tara House)
 
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